Casirivimab-Imdevimab treatment is associated with reduced rates of hospitalization among high-risk patients with mild to moderate coronavirus disease-19

Published in EClinicalMedicine

Aug 30 2021

BACKGROUND. Real-world clinical data to support the use of casirivimab–imdevimab for the treatment of outpatients with mild to moderate coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) is needed. This study aimed to assess the outcomes of casirivimab–imdevimab treatment of mild to moderate COVID-19.

METHODS. A retrospective cohort of 696 patients who received casirivimab–imdevimab between December 4, 2020 and April 9, 2021 was compared to a propensity-matched control of 696 untreated patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 at Mayo Clinic sites in Arizona, Florida, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. Primary outcome was rate of hospitalization at days 14, 21 and 28 after infusion.

RESULTS. The median age of the antibody-treated cohort was 63 years (interquartile range, 52–71); 45·5% were ≥65 years old; 51.4% were female. High-risk characteristics were hypertension (52.4%), body mass index ≥35 (31.0%), diabetes mellitus (24.6%), chronic lung disease (22.1%), chronic renal disease (11.4%), congestive heart failure (6.6%), and compromised immune function (6.7%). Compared to the propensity-matched untreated control, patients who received casirivimab–imdevimab had significantly lower all-cause hospitalization rates at day 14 (1.3% vs 3.3%; Absolute Difference: 2.0%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.5–3.7%), day 21 (1.3% vs 4.2%; Absolute Difference: 2.9%; 95% CI: 1.2–4.7%), and day 28 (1.6% vs 4.8%; Absolute Difference: 3.2%; 95% CI: 1.4–5.1%). Rates of intensive care unit admission and mortality at days 14, 21 and 28 were similarly low for antibody-treated and untreated groups.

CONCLUSIONS. Among high-risk patients with mild to moderate COVID-19, casirivimab–imdevimab treatment was associated with a significantly lower rate of hospitalization.

 

Authors:

Raymund R. Razonable, Colin Pawlowski, John C. OHoro, Lori L. Arndt, Richard Arndt, Dennis M. Bierle, Molly Destro Borgen, Sara N. Hanson, Michelle C. Hedin, Patrick Lenehan, Arjun Puranik, Maria T Seville, Leigh L. Speicher, Sidna M. Tulledge-Scheitel, AJ Venkatakrishnan, Caroline G. Wilker, Andrew D. Badley, Ravindra Ganesh

nference Cambridge, United States
Mayo Clinic Rochester, United States
 

Correspondence: Andrew Badley (badley.andrew@mayo.edu)

 
 
 
Affiliations:
mayo-logo-3-3-Mar-05-2021-08-48-39-00-PM
 
Copyright:
The copyright holder for this preprint is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.